Henry de Bohun is most likely the son of John de Bohun and Joan de Baa and half first cousin of Humphrey de Bohun (d 1298), Earl of Hereford and Essex, father of the Earl who fought at Bannockburn. He is infamous for his death at the Battle of Bannockburn at the hands of Robert the Bruce. In Vita Edwardi Secundi it is stated that “the Scots were seen straggling under the trees as if in flight” and this encouraged Henry de Bohun to set off ahead of the English vanguard with his contingent of Welsh troops. They found Robert the Bruce in the trees with his men and Henry made a direct attack on Robert himself with a view to either killing or capturing him. “Sir Henry rode towards the King, who, when he saw his oncoming, and how before the rest he sped, to meet him turned his palfrey’s head.” Henry missed his aim and Robert, swinging his axe round, “raucht him a dynt” which cut his head open and killed him instantly. This, however, broke the axe in two and when Robert was rebuked by his commanders for rashly taking part in single combat with Henry he “but mourned his battle-axe, that so, was shattered by a single blow.” The English on seeing this encounter fled and the Scots had the advantage.

Henry left a wife, Joan de Plugenet but no issue.

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